We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More... We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More... We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More... We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More... We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More... We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More... We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More... We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More...

History of Cambodia

The good, the bad and the ugly is a simple way to sum up Cambodian history. Things were good in the early years, culminating in the vast Angkor empire, unrivalled in the region during four centuries of dominance. Then the bad set in, from the 13th century, as ascendant neighbours steadily chipped away at Cambodian territory. In the 20th century it turned downright ugly, as a brutal civil war culminated in the genocidal rule of the Khmer Rouge (1975–79), from which Cambodia is still recovering.

The origin of the Khmers

Cambodia came into being, so the legend says, through the union of a princess and a foreigner. The foreigner was an Indian Brahman named Kaundinya and the princess was the daughter of a dragon king who ruled over a watery land. One day, as Kaundinya sailed by, the princess paddled out in a boat to greet him. Kaundinya shot an arrow from his magic bow into her boat, causing the fearful princess to agree to marriage. In need of a dowry, her father drank up the waters of his land and presented them to Kaundinya to rule over. The new kingdom was named Kambuja.

Like many legends, this one is historically opaque, but it does say something about the cultural forces that brought Cambodia into existence, in particular its relationship with its great subcontinental neighbour, India. Cambodia’s religious, royal and written traditions stemmed from India and began to coalesce as a cultural entity in their own right between the 1st and 5th centuries. Very little is known about prehistoric Cambodia. Much of the southeast was a vast, shallow gulf that was progressively silted up by the mouths of the Mekong, leaving pancake-flat, mineral-rich land ideal for farming. Evidence of cave-dwellers has been found in the northwest of Cambodia. Carbon dating on ceramic pots found in the area shows that they were made around 4200 BC, but it is hard to say whether there is a direct relationship between these cave-dwelling pot makers and contemporary Khmers. Examinations of bones dating back to around 1500 BC, however, suggest that the people living in Cambodia at that time resembled the Cambodians of today. Early Chinese records report that the Cambodians were ‘ugly’ and ‘dark’ and went about naked. However, a healthy dose of scepticism is always required when reading the culturally chauvinistic reports of imperial China concerning its ‘barbarian’ neighbours.

The early Cambodian kingdoms

Cambodian might didn’t begin and end with Angkor. There were a number of powerful kingdoms present in this area before the 9th century.

From the 1st century, the Indianisation of Cambodia occurred through trading settlements that sprang up on the coastline of what is now southern Vietnam, but was then inhabited by the Khmers. These settlements were important ports of call for boats following the trading route from the Bay of Bengal to the southern provinces of China. The largest of these nascent kingdoms was known as Funan by the Chinese, and may have existed across an area between Ba Phnom in Prey Veng Province, a site only worth visiting for the archaeologically obsessed today, and Oc-Eo in Kien Giang Province in southern Vietnam. Funan would have been a contemporary of Champasak in southern Laos(then known as Kuruksetra) and other lesser fiefdoms in the region.

Funan is a Chinese name, and it may be a transliteration of the ancient Khmer word bnam (mountain). Although very little is known about Funan, much has been made of its importance as an early Southeast Asian centre of power.

It is most likely that between the 1st and 8th centuries, Cambodia was a collection of small states, each with its own elites that often strategically intermarried and often went to war with one another. Funan was no doubt one of these states, and as a major sea port would have been pivotal in the transmission of Indian culture into the interior of Cambodia.

The little that historians do know about Funan has mostly been gleaned from Chinese sources. These report that Funan-period Cambodia (1st to 6th centuries AD) embraced the worship of the Hindu deities Shiva and Vishnu and, at the same time, Buddhism. The linga (phallic totem) appears to have been the focus of ritual and an emblem of kingly might, a feature that was to evolve further in the Angkorian cult of the god-king. The people practised primitive irrigation, which enabled successful cultivation of rice, and traded raw commodities such as spices with China and India.

From the 6th century, Cambodia’s population gradually concentrated along the Mekong and Tonlé Sap Rivers, where the majority remains today. The move may have been related to the development of wet-rice agriculture. From the 6th to 8th centuries it was likely that Cambodia was a collection of competing kingdoms, ruled by autocratic kings who legitimised their absolute rule through hierarchical caste concepts borrowed from India.

This era is generally referred to as the Chenla period. Again, like Funan, it is a Chinese term and there is little to support the idea that Chenla was a unified kingdom that held sway over all of Cambodia. Indeed, the Chinese themselves referred to ‘water Chenla’ and ‘land Chenla’. Water Chenla was located around Angkor Borei and the temple mount of Phnom Da, near the present-day provincial capital of Takeo, and land Chenla in the upper reaches of the Mekong River and east of Tonlé Sap Lake, around Sambor Prei Kuk, an essential stop on a chronological jaunt through Cambodia’s history.

Budgetary

The Siem Reap Angkor Agape School came into being in 14th February 2005.
The Budgetary sources
- The best one is from Norway
- From Parents’ Association
- From our students’ parents
- From Khmer helps Khmer Churches
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About School

We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Moreover, we also sent our prayer request through internet to brothers and sisters throughout the world to help us... Read more...

Our Mission

SAS has the plan or mission to build up the educational citizen that can know clearly not only the word of God but also the world knowledge with real possible vocation (knowledge and skill), higher personality characteristic (disciplinable, moral, virtuous, and high attendant). Read more...


Address / អាស័យដ្ឋាន:

Trang Village, Kondek Communce, Prasat Bakong District, Siem Reap Province, Cambodia.
ភូមត្រាង ឃុំកណ្តែក ស្រុកបា្រសាទបាគង ខេត្តសៀមរាប ព្រះរាជាណាចក្រកម្ពុជា

E_mail

info@agapeschool.org
bethelvuthy@gmail.com

Telephone

+85512994822
+85511994822
+85516994822
+855977994822

Partner

Website: www.agapetechnology.info
E-mail: info@agapetechnology.info

Other Website in Cambodia

គណៈកម្មការជាតិរៀបចំការបោះឆ្នោត
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