We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More... We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More... We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More... We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More... We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More... We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More... We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More... We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More...

Cambodian cuisine

1-Prahok:

A common ingredient, almost a national institution, is a pungent type of fermented fish paste used in many dishes, a distinctive flavoring known as prahok (ប្រហុក). It's an acquired taste for most Westerners, but is an integral part of Khmer cuisine and is included in many dishes or used as a dipping sauce. The liberal use of prahok, which adds a salty tang to many dishes, is a characteristic which distinguishes Khmer cuisine from that of its neighbours. Prahok can be prepared many ways and eaten as a dish on its own right. Prahok jien (ប្រហុកជៀន), is fried and usually mixed with meat (usually beef or pork) and chilli. It can also be eaten with dips, vegetables like cucumbers or eggplants, and rice. Prahok gop or prahok ang (ប្រហុកកប់) or (ប្រហុកអាំង) is covered with banana leaves and left to cook under a fire under pieces of rock or over the coals. When prahok is not used, kapǐ (កាពិ), a kind of fermented shrimp paste is used instead. Khmer cuisine also uses fish sauce widely in soups and stir-fried dishes, and as a dipping sauce.

2-Noodles:

Many elements of Cambodian noodle dishes were inspired by Chinese and Vietnamese cooking despite maintaining a distinct Khmer variation. Prahok is never used with noodle dishes. Rice stick noodles are used in mee katang (មីកាតាំង), which is a Cambodian variation of chǎo fěn with gravy. Unlike the Chinese styled chǎo fěn, the noodles are plated under the stir fry beef and vegetables and topped off with scrambled eggs. Burmese style noodles (មីកុឡា - Mee Kola) is a vegetarian dish made from thin rice stick noodles, steamed and cooked with soy sauce and garlic chives. This is served with pickled vegetables Jroak (ជ្រក់), julienned eggs, and sweet garlic fish sauce garnished with crushed peanuts. Mi Cha (មីឆា) is stir fried egg noodles.

3-Kroeung:

From India, by way of Java, Cambodians have been taught the art of blending spices into a paste using many ingredients like cardamom, star anise, cloves, cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger and turmeric. Other native ingredients like lemongrass, galangal, garlic, shallots, cilantro, and kaffir lime leaves are added to this mix to make a distinctive and complex spice blend called "kroeung." Other ingredients for kroeung used by Khmers in America are lemongrass, turmeric powder, garlic, prahok, and lemon leaf. This is an important aromatic paste commonly used in Cambodian cooking.

4-Vegetables:

Many vegetables used in Khmer cuisine are also used in Chinese cuisine. Vegetables such as winter melon, bitter melon, luffa, water spinach and yardlong beans can be found in soups and stews. Oriental squash can be stewed, stir fried or sweetened and steamed with coconut milk as a dessert. Vegetables like mushrooms, cabbage, baby corn, bamboo shoots, fresh ginger, kai-lan ("Chinese broccoli"), snow peas, and bok choy are commonly used in many different stir fry dishes. Together these stir fry dishes are known by the generic term chhar (ឆា). Banana blossoms are sliced and added to some noodle dishes like nom banh chok.

5-Fruits:

Fruits in Cambodia are so popular that they have their own royal court. The durian is considered the "king," the mangosteen the "queen," sapodilla the "prince" and the milk fruit (phlai teuk doh ko) the "princess." Other popular fruits include: the jan fruit, kuy fruit, romduol, pineapple, star apple, rose apple, coconut, palmyra fruit, jackfruit, papaya, watermelon, banana, mango and rambutan. Although fruits are usually considered desserts, some fruits such as ripe mangoes, watermelon, and pineapples are eaten commonly with heavily salted fish with plain rice. Fruits are also made into beverages called tuk kolok (ទឹក កលក់), mostly shakes. Popular fruits for shakes are durian, mangoes, bananas.

6-Fish and meat:

As the country has an extensive network of waterways, freshwater fish plays a large part in the diet of most Cambodians, making its way into many recipes. Daily fresh catches come from the Mekong River, Bassac River and the vast Tonlé Sap. Fish is far more common than meat in Khmer cuisine and fish forms 60% of the Cambodian intake of proteins.[citation needed] Prahok itself is based on fish. Many of the fish types eaten in Cambodia are freshwater fish from the Tonlé Sap or from the Mekong. Dried salted fish known as trei ngeat (ត្រីងៀត) are a favourite with plain rice porridge. The popular Khmer dish called amok uses a kind of catfish steamed in a savoury coconut-based curry. The small fish known as Trey Dang Dau are very common and are often eaten deep-fried.

While freshwater fish is the most commonly used meat in the Cambodian diet, pork and chicken are also popular. Though not as common as in neighbouring Vietnam, vegetarian food is a part of Khmer cuisine and often favoured by more observant Buddhists.

Pork is quite popular in making sweet Khmer sausages known as twah ko (ត្វារគោ). Beef and chicken are stewed, grilled or stir fried. Seafood includes an array of shellfish such as clams, cockles, crayfish, shrimp and squid. Lobsters are not commonly eaten because of their price, but middle-class and rich Cambodians enjoy eating them at Sihanoukville. Duck roasted in Chinese char siu style is popular during festivals. More unusual varieties of meat include frog, turtle, and arthropods (including tarantulas); these would are difficult to find in Khmer cuisine abroad but are used in everyday dishes in Cambodia.

 

 

Budgetary

The Siem Reap Angkor Agape School came into being in 14th February 2005.
The Budgetary sources
- The best one is from Norway
- From Parents’ Association
- From our students’ parents
- From Khmer helps Khmer Churches
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About School

We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Moreover, we also sent our prayer request through internet to brothers and sisters throughout the world to help us... Read more...

Our Mission

SAS has the plan or mission to build up the educational citizen that can know clearly not only the word of God but also the world knowledge with real possible vocation (knowledge and skill), higher personality characteristic (disciplinable, moral, virtuous, and high attendant). Read more...


Address / អាស័យដ្ឋាន:

Trang Village, Kondek Communce, Prasat Bakong District, Siem Reap Province, Cambodia.
ភូមត្រាង ឃុំកណ្តែក ស្រុកបា្រសាទបាគង ខេត្តសៀមរាប ព្រះរាជាណាចក្រកម្ពុជា

E_mail

info@agapeschool.org
bethelvuthy@gmail.com

Telephone

+85512994822
+85511994822
+85516994822
+855977994822

Partner

Website: www.agapetechnology.info
E-mail: info@agapetechnology.info

Other Website in Cambodia

គណៈកម្មការជាតិរៀបចំការបោះឆ្នោត
ក្រសួងមហាផ្ទៃ
ក្រសួងអប់រំយុវជននិងកីឡា
ក្រសួងធម្មការនិងសាសនា
ព្រឹទ្ធសភានៃព្រះរាជាណាចក្រកម្ពុជា
រដ្ឋសភានៃព្រះរាជាណាចក្រកម្ពុជា
Harvest Training Cambodia

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