We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More... We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More... We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More... We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More... We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More... We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More... We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More... We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Read More...

Culture of Cambodia

Throughout Cambodia's long history, religion has been a major source of cultural inspiration. Over nearly two millennia, Cambodians have developed a unique Khmer belief from the syncreticism of indigenous animistic beliefs and the Indian religions of Buddhism and Hinduism. Indian culture and civilization, including its languages and arts reached mainland Southeast Asia around the 1st century AD. It is generally believed that seafaring merchants brought Indian customs and culture to ports along the Gulf of Thailand and the Pacific en route to trade with China. The Kingdom of Funan was most probably the first Khmer state to benefit from this influx of Indian ideas.

History

The golden age of Cambodia was between the 9th and 14th century, during the Angkor period, during which it was a powerful and prosperous empire that flourished and dominated almost all of inland Southeast Asia. However, Angkor would eventually collapse after much in-fighting between royalty and constant warring with its increasingly powerful neighbors, notably Siam and Dai Viet. Many temples from this period however, like Bayon and Angkor Wat still remain today, scattered throughout Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, and Vietnam as a reminder of the grandeur of Khmer arts and culture. Cambodia's unparalleled achievements in art, architectures, music, and dance during this period have had a great influence on many neighboring kingdoms, namely Thailand and Laos. The effect of Angkorian culture can still be seen today in those countries, as they share many close characteristics with current-day Cambodia.

Architecture and housing

The Angkorian architects and sculptors created temples that mapped the cosmic world in stone. Khmer decorations drew inspiration from religion, and mythical creatures from Hinduism and Buddhism were carved on walls. Temples were built in accordance to the rule of ancient Khmer architecture that dictated that a basic temple layout include a central shrine, a courtyard, an enclosing wall, and a moat. Khmer motifs use many creatures from Buddhist and Hindu mythology, like the Royal Palace in Phnom Penh, use motifs such as the garuda, a mythical bird in Hinduism. The architecture of Cambodia developed in stages under the Khmer empire from the 9th to the 15th century, preserved in many buildings of the Angkor temple. The remains of secular architecture from this time are rare, as only religious buildings were made of stone. The architecture of the Angkor period used specific structural features and styles, which are one of the main methods used to date the temples, along with inscriptions.

In modern rural Cambodia, the nuclear family typically lives in a rectangular house that may vary in size from four by six meters to six by ten meters. It is constructed of a wooden frame with gabled thatch roof and walls of woven bamboo. Khmer houses are typically raised as much as three meters on stilts for protection from annual floods. Two ladders or wooden staircases provide access to the house. The steep thatch roof overhanging the house walls protects the interior from rain. Typically a house contains three rooms separated by partitions of woven bamboo. The front room serves as a living room used to receive visitors, the next room is the parents' bedroom, and the third is for unmarried daughters. Sons sleep anywhere they can find space. Family members and neighbors work together to build the house, and a house-raising ceremony is held upon its completion. The houses of poorer persons may contain only a single large room. Food is prepared in a separate kitchen located near the house but usually behind it. Toilet facilities consist of simple pits in the ground, located away from the house, that are covered up when filled. Any livestock is kept below the house. Chinese and Vietnamese houses in Cambodian towns and villages are typically built directly on the ground and have earthen, cement, or tile floors, depending upon the economic status of the owner. Urban housing and commercial buildings may be of brick, masonry, or wood.

Courtship, marriage, and divorce

In Cambodia, premarital sex is deplored. The choice of a spouse is a complex one for the young male, and it may involve not only his parents and his friends, as well as those of the young woman, but also a matchmaker and a Haora. In theory, a girl may veto the spouse her parents have chosen. Courtship patterns differ between rural and urban Khmer; romantic love is a notion that exists to a much greater extent in larger cities. A man usually marries between the ages of nineteen and twenty-five, a girl between the ages of sixteen and twenty-two. After a spouse has been selected, each family investigates the other to make sure its child is marrying into a good family. In rural areas, there is a form of bride-service; that is, the young man may take a vow to serve his prospective father-in-law for a period of time. Pre-wedding photographs of Cambodian couple at Angkor Wat Bride and groom at a Cambodian wedding The traditional wedding is a long and colorful affair. Formerly it lasted three days, but in the 1980s it more commonly lasted a day and a half. Buddhist priests offer a short sermon and recite prayers of blessing. Parts of the ceremony involve ritual hair cutting, tying cotton threads soaked in holy water around the bride's and groom's wrists, and passing a candle around a circle of happily married and respected couples to bless the union. After the wedding, a banquet is held. Newlyweds traditionally move in with the wife's parents and may live with them up to a year, until they can build a new house nearby. Divorce is legal and relatively easy to obtain, but not common. Divorced persons are viewed with some disapproval. Each spouse retains whatever property he or she brought into the marriage, and jointly-acquired property is divided equally. Divorced persons may remarry, but the woman must wait ten months. Custody of minor children is usually given to the mother, and both parents continue to have an obligation to contribute financially toward the rearing and education of the child. The divorced male doesn't have a waiting period before he can re-marry

Budgetary

The Siem Reap Angkor Agape School came into being in 14th February 2005.
The Budgetary sources
- The best one is from Norway
- From Parents’ Association
- From our students’ parents
- From Khmer helps Khmer Churches
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About School

We pray everyday to up hold our school in the kingdom of God, children's family and our country. Moreover, we also sent our prayer request through internet to brothers and sisters throughout the world to help us... Read more...

Our Mission

SAS has the plan or mission to build up the educational citizen that can know clearly not only the word of God but also the world knowledge with real possible vocation (knowledge and skill), higher personality characteristic (disciplinable, moral, virtuous, and high attendant). Read more...


Address / អាស័យដ្ឋាន:

Trang Village, Kondek Communce, Prasat Bakong District, Siem Reap Province, Cambodia.
ភូមត្រាង ឃុំកណ្តែក ស្រុកបា្រសាទបាគង ខេត្តសៀមរាប ព្រះរាជាណាចក្រកម្ពុជា

E_mail

info@agapeschool.org
bethelvuthy@gmail.com

Telephone

+85512994822
+85511994822
+85516994822
+855977994822

Partner

Website: www.agapetechnology.info
E-mail: info@agapetechnology.info

Other Website in Cambodia

គណៈកម្មការជាតិរៀបចំការបោះឆ្នោត
ក្រសួងមហាផ្ទៃ
ក្រសួងអប់រំយុវជននិងកីឡា
ក្រសួងធម្មការនិងសាសនា
ព្រឹទ្ធសភានៃព្រះរាជាណាចក្រកម្ពុជា
រដ្ឋសភានៃព្រះរាជាណាចក្រកម្ពុជា
Harvest Training Cambodia

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